Boring description goes here...
Reblogged from inothernews  126 notes

Women make less than men for doing the same job. On average, 22 percent less. They also are less likely to ask for a raise.

While there is some evidence the pay gap is narrower in the tech sector, the gender imbalance is real, including at Microsoft, which last week reported that women make up 29 percent of its global workforce.

Presumably Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella considered these issues before he sat down for an interview with fellow Microsoft board member Maria Klawe at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, a high-profile annual event for leading women in tech.

Near the end of the interview, Klawe asked Nadella what advice he would give to women who aren’t comfortable asking for a raise.

His answer?

“It’s not really about asking for a raise, but knowing and having faith that the system will give you the right raise,” Nadella said.

The system hasn’t done a good job of addressing the pay gap thus far. But hey, there’s always “karma.”

Nadella continued: “That might be one of the initial ‘super powers,’ that quite frankly, women who don’t ask for a raise have … It’s good karma. It will come back.”

“This is one of the very few things I disagree with you on,” said Klawe, drawing applause. Klawe maintained Nadella is “an amazing leader” whom she adores.

“Oh dear. Oh my. No, no, no,” was the response of Re/code’s Kara Swisher, one of the aforementioned leading women in tech. The blog Readwrite has a roundup of similar reactions registered on Twitter.

Several hours later, Nadella tweeted an apology: “Was inarticulate re how women should ask for raise. Our industry must close gender pay gap so a raise is not needed because of a bias.”

By

The Washington Post, "Walkback? Microsoft CEO Saying Women Should Rely on ‘Karma’ for Raises."

A fail more epic than Windows ME.

Can’t wait until my co-workers get back from this conference.

Reblogged from latimes  1,353 notes
latimes:

A federal judge has ruled that police officers in Ferguson violated the Constitution by requiring protesters to keep moving rather than stand still during demonstrations following the death of Michael Brown.
The judge issued a preliminary injunction in response to a lawsuit brought against St. Louis County and the superintendent of the Missouri Highway Patrol by Mustafa Abdullah, an ACLU staffer.
Photo: Demonstrators march during a protest on West Florissant Ave. in Ferguson on August 18. Credit: Michael B. Thomas / AFP/Getty Images

latimes:

A federal judge has ruled that police officers in Ferguson violated the Constitution by requiring protesters to keep moving rather than stand still during demonstrations following the death of Michael Brown.

The judge issued a preliminary injunction in response to a lawsuit brought against St. Louis County and the superintendent of the Missouri Highway Patrol by Mustafa Abdullah, an ACLU staffer.

Photo: Demonstrators march during a protest on West Florissant Ave. in Ferguson on August 18. Credit: Michael B. Thomas / AFP/Getty Images

Reblogged from scinerds  264 notes
laboratoryequipment:

Textbooks May be Wrong About VolcanoesIn the typical textbook picture, volcanoes, such as those that are forming the Hawaiian islands, erupt when magma gushes out as narrow jets from deep inside Earth. But that picture is wrong, according to a new study from researchers at Caltech and the Univ. of Miami.New seismology data are confirming that such narrow jets don’t actually exist, says Don Anderson, the Eleanor and John R. McMillian Professor of Geophysics, Emeritus, at Caltech. In fact, he adds, basic physics doesn’t support the presence of these jets, called mantle plumes, and the new results corroborate those fundamental ideas.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/textbooks-may-be-wrong-about-volcanoes

laboratoryequipment:

Textbooks May be Wrong About Volcanoes

In the typical textbook picture, volcanoes, such as those that are forming the Hawaiian islands, erupt when magma gushes out as narrow jets from deep inside Earth. But that picture is wrong, according to a new study from researchers at Caltech and the Univ. of Miami.

New seismology data are confirming that such narrow jets don’t actually exist, says Don Anderson, the Eleanor and John R. McMillian Professor of Geophysics, Emeritus, at Caltech. In fact, he adds, basic physics doesn’t support the presence of these jets, called mantle plumes, and the new results corroborate those fundamental ideas.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/textbooks-may-be-wrong-about-volcanoes

Reblogged from breakingnews  183 notes
breakingnews:




LGBT group to march in NYC’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade

AP: The world’s largest St. Patrick’s Day Parade, in New York City, is ending a ban and allowing a gay group to march under its own banner for the first time.


The parade committee, in a statement made available to The Associated Press, said on Wednesday that OUT@NBCUniversal, a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender support group at the company that broadcasts the parade, would be marching up Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue on March 17 under an identifying banner.


Photo: New York City St. Patrick’s Day parade-goers. (AFP/Getty Images)

breakingnews:

LGBT group to march in NYC’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade
AP: The world’s largest St. Patrick’s Day Parade, in New York City, is ending a ban and allowing a gay group to march under its own banner for the first time.
The parade committee, in a statement made available to The Associated Press, said on Wednesday that OUT@NBCUniversal, a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender support group at the company that broadcasts the parade, would be marching up Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue on March 17 under an identifying banner.
Photo: New York City St. Patrick’s Day parade-goers. (AFP/Getty Images)